Library History

Trenton Veterans Memorial Library

dedicated to all who faithfully served our country in time of need

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The tradition of library services in Trenton began in 1927 through the efforts of the Trenton Exchange Club. The first library was dedicated on March 23, 1928 and opened its doors for business the following day with Mrs. Muriel K. Bennett as the first librarian. It was named the Trenton Public Library and located in the basement of the Municipal Building. Entrance to the library was by an outside walk-down to a collection of 1,700 books.

In the fall of 1953, the library began a collection of 78 rpm records which could be borrowed by patrons. Featured records for children included "Ding-Dong School". Those first records were donated by the Trenton Music Club.

A new innovation---an after-hours book drop was also started in 1953. At year's end, it was determined that the library had clearly outgrown its location. A contest was held and a savings bond was given to the winner and about 100 sketches were received from students. The Village Engineer was instructed by the City Council to seek an architect. The location chosen for the library was the corner of West Road and Westfield and on January 12, 1959 the library moved into its new building. It was officially dedicated on February 15, 1959.

 

In the mid 1970s the name was changed to the Trenton Veterans Memorial Library. Demand for increased library services made this building obsolete and on November 4, 1997 Trenton voters approved a $4,000,000 bond issue to fund and construct a new library.

 

Constructed on the same site, the new library covers 21,000 square feet making it capable of increasing its book collection to over 90,000 volumes. Patrons have access to Internet, electronic information, increased programming for children, access to Trenton's historical documents. The new building is designed to adapt to future changes in library technology. For over seventy years Trenton has provided a library to the community. As the new millennium approaches, Trenton can take pride in continuing its heritage and tradition of providing quality library services.

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